How To Decant Wine

If you’ve ever wondered what the correct process for decanting wine is, then don’t worry because you are not alone. Not many people outside of expert wine circles know much about decanting and it can have an almost mystical quality about it. And that isn’t helped by the lack of quality guides on the subject. All over the Internet you can find wine cooler reviews, advice on selecting and serving wines and even tips on selecting glass ware. However, there isn’t a whole lot of information on the subject of properly decanting a wine. I aim to change that today.

The purpose of this guide is to demystify the decanting process and show how it can improve the quality of your wine. If you read this guide closely, then you will not only learn about the purpose of decanting but you will also learn how to properly do it.

What is Wine Decanting

Wine decanting is merely the process of transferring the wine from the bottle into another container; a container called a decanter. There are two reasons to decant a wine. First, it acts to aerate the wine. Second, it removes sediment from the wine.

Red wines tend to develop a sediment in the bottom of the bottles as they age. This sediment not only clouds the wine but it can impart tannic or bitter compounds into the wine, therefore making it less enjoyable to drink. That is why wine decanting is so important.

Prepare To Decant

The first thing you need to do before you begin the process of decanting is to locate a proper decanter. There are many different varieties available, but they can be generally broken down into two categories. The old fashioned versions that are basically just glass vessels, and the modern versions that strain the wine as you pour it through. It doesn’t matter which one you choose, either one will work.

The next thing you will want to do is to place your wine in your best wine cooler and cool it to proper temperature at least 24 hours before you open it and decant it. While you are storing it, it should be placed upright so the sediment can settle on the bottom of the bottle.

Time To Decant

Now you can begin to decant the wine. Pour it slowly into the decanter until you have emptied about half of the bottle into it. When you reach this mark, slow down your pouring even further. When the sediment reaches the neck of the bottle, then you should stop. Discard the remaining sediment laden wine from your bottle.

Wines that are 10 years or older should be decanted for about 30 minutes. Younger wines can be decanted for a longer period of time, but should never be decanted for more than an hour. You might want to try out different times to see which is best for your particular wine. Once you’ve done that you can then enjoy the fruits of your labor.