Basic Types Of Red Wine

My last article on the basics of white wine was received so enthusiastically, I’ve decided I am going to cover the basic types of  red wines. As in the previous article, please remember that this guide is intended as a primer for those of you who have little to no experience with wines and it isn’t necessarily intended for those who are well versed in wine. In this guide, I am not only going to show you the different types of red wine, but I am also going to show you what flavor profiles you can expect from each variety and what food pairs best with them.

A word of caution before we begin, however. While red wine isn’t as sensitive to temperature changes as white wines—in fact some are best served warm—it is still important to buy the best wine cooler available to store your wine. Especially if you are buying quite a few different varieties.

Shiraz: This type of wine is one that is usually crafted in Europe, but there are also some great Australian and American brands of this wine. Shiraz is a spicy full body red that has a blackcurrant overtone and may has some peppery secondary notes. It is a wine that is best served with roasted meats and wild game.

Merlot: This red wine is one that is recognized by just about everyone; both wine novices and seasoned pros. It often displays plum or black cherry notes and has less of a tannin flavor than its cousin,  Cabernet Sauvignon. Because of the versatility of this wine, it can be paired with just about any type of food and it will complement it.

Cabernet Sauvignon: This wine has a full body taste that is sort of acidic. Because of the high tannin level of this wine, it is best to keep it stored at around 52 degrees so that it’s rich flavor profile isn’t altered too much. That is why you should check wine cooler reviews to find a cooler that can operate in this temperature range. A good Cabernet Sauvignon can be served with any type of red meat.

Pinot noir: Pinot noir can be describes as the exact opposite of Cabernet Sauvignon. Instead of a rich, viscous body it has a delicate and fresh tasting body. It often has a fruity flavor that is underpinned by earthy tones. It is best served with lamb, chicken, sushi and salmon.

Sangiovese: This is a medium body wine that is produced in Italy and California. It often has berry or plum undertones. Sangiovese is best served with Mediterranean and Italian dishes.

Barbera: This red wine has much of the same characteristics as Merlot, but isn’t as popular. It has a silky texture that has a good acid level and has black cherry notes to it. Barbera is a red wine that is best served with dishes that contain a tomato-based sauce, but its versatility really allows it to be served with just about any dish.

Making Your Own Wine

If you’ve always wanted to make your own wine, then you are in luck. That is because I am going to tell you how to get started making your own wine products. While this guide isn’t a comprehensive guide on the art of wine-making—after all, I really don’t have the space to write that—it will serve as a primer to get you started. Hopefully, reading this article will peak your curiosity and get you started down the road to making your own wines.

Before you start however, you are going to need a few items besides your best wine cooler, some bottles and some grapes. You are going to need things such as 2 6 gallon food grade buckets, a siphon hose, a chlorinated sanitizer, something to stir with, a rubber bung, an airlock device, sugar, yeast, a PH balancer, Sulphite, Bentonite, Potasium sorbate, Kieselsol and Chitosan. You can buy all of these things individually from your local home-brew shop or off the Internet, or you can buy them in a complete package. This guide is going to assume that you are using a kit.

Day 1: The next thing you should do is sterilize all of your equipment with your sanitizing solution and rinse it well with fresh water. Take one of your six gallon buckets and make it your primary fermenter. Add the Bentonite to the bucket and add 1 gallon of water. Dissolve completely. Now empty the contents of your juice concentrate bladder. Add 5 more gallons of water to the bucket. Make sure the temperature of the water is around 75 degrees, but no hotter. Stir the mixture well and add the yeast. Don’t stir the mixture anymore after adding the yeast, however. Cap the bucket and place it in a dark, cool location such as your closet. Don’t touch the bucket for a minimum of four days.

Day 5:  Check the mixture. It should be nice and foamy, an indicator that the yeast is doing its job. If it isn’t doing this, then you probably didn’t sterilize the equipment properly and will have to start all over. If it’s bubbly, then cap it up and place it in your closet for another 9 days.

Day 14: Sanitize your secondary bucket and siphon the wine mixture into this bucket. Now it’s time to mix in the rest of the ingredients in order and stirring after adding each component. Start off with the Sulphite and then add the  Potassium Sorbate, Kieselsol and Chitosan. Allow to sit for 5 minutes. Now sanitize the airlock and place it on your container. Place it your closet for 2 more weeks.

Day 28: Your wine is now done and ready to be bottled. After you have bottled it, place it in your wine cooler and chill it down. If you don’t have a cooler, then check wine cooler reviews and buy a good one. Congratulations on making your first batch of wine!

How To Choose A Wine

If it’s your turn to buy the next bottle of wine and don’t really know how to go about it, then don’t worry I am here to help. I am going to show you how to buy a bottle of wine that will not only invigorate your senses but will floor all of your friends at your next party. Choosing a wine may seem like a complicated endeavor but it really isn’t if you know the basics.

Before I give you the low-down on buying that perfect bottle of wine, I want to take a few moments to remind you that you need a few basics in order to properly open and serve that awesome wine you just picked up. Hopefully, you have gone through wine cooler reviews and chosen the perfect cooler, have bought a Sommelier Knife and have a good corkscrew. If you already have all of those things, then congratulations you can go through the process of buying your wine. If not, then gather all of those things together before continuing.

Wine And Food Pairings

Choosing the right wine type to go with what you are serving can get a bit complicated, but I can simplify things by giving you a few simple guidelines that will get you started on your way. I have listed some of the more common wine types and paired them with sample meals so you can get an idea of the type of wine that goes well with certain dishes.

Pinot Grigio or Arneis: These go very well with light fish dishes such as white fish.

Chardonnay: Tends to go well with fattier fish dishes. Examples include salmon or dishes with rich sauces.

 Asti Spumante and Moscato d’Asti: Goes well with fruit based desserts

Rosé Champagne: Is a very versatile wine and can go with just about any meal.

Dry Rosé: Goes with any dish where cheese is the main ingredient.

Pinot Noir: Pair earthy foods such as mushrooms and truffles with this wine.

Cabernet Sauvignon: Goes well with red meat and Italian dishes.

Read The Wine Label And Check The Bottle

Everything you need to know about the wine is right there on the bottle. If you pay close attention to it, then it will give you the information you need to decide if the wine is a good or not.

The first thing you should check is the location of where the wine was made and bottled. You want to buy a wine that was bottled where it was made. Avoid wines that are made one place and bottled someplace else.

The next thing you should look for is a cork. While I realize that a lot of wine bottles have screw-off caps, you should still avoid them. Vintage wines are corked, while cheaper wines usually aren’t. It’s one of the biggest indicators of quality you can glean from the bottle.

If quality matters to you, then you might want to buy a bottle of wine that is over $20. There simply aren’t many quality wines that are cheaper than that.

The last thing you should look for is the punt on the bottom of the bottle. This indentation is there to distribute pressure within the bottle and helps along the aging process. The better the quality of wine the bigger this indentation will be. Cheap wines generally don’t have an indentation – or if they do – they are very small.

That my friends is everything you need to know to buy a quality bottle of wine. Follow the above steps and gather together your equipment (corkscrew, knife and best wine cooler) and you can rest assured that you will be capable of giving your guest the wine experience of their life.

How To Serve Wine – The Basics

You’ve read through all the wine cooler reviews and have selected the perfect model for you and you’ve found the perfect place to do it. Now all you need to know is how to properly serve the wine that is now secure in your cooler and chilled to the ideal temperature. While that might seem like an easy proposition, it’s not as easy as you think. There’s more to serving wine than simply popping a cork and pouring it into a wine glass. How you serve it is as important as the wine selection itself and how it’s been stored.

Temperature, the quality of the glassware and even how you decant the wine can have a significant impact on the wine’s overall flavor and texture. And that is why I have decided to write this guide for you today. To show you how to properly serve your wine so that you get the most enjoyment from it. Follow these steps and you’ll never be faced with a wine that is underwhelming or disappointing ever again.

Temperature

One of the first things you need to consider is the temperature of the wine. Far too often people pay little attention to the temperature at which they serve their wine. I have been to far too many parties where people have served white wines that were too cold and red wines that were served too warm. While the temperature at which a wine is served can be impacted by an individual’s personal tastes, there are ideal temperatures for each different type of wine. I have listed some of the most common wines and their ideal temperatures so you can get a good grasp on the ideal temperature at which to serve your wine.

Rosés, Dry Light White Wines, Dessert Wines and Sparkling Wines-The ideal temperature for these wines is between 40 and 50 degrees. This temperature will not only preserve the fine bubbles in these wines but will also allow it to retain its light, fruity flavor.

Chardonnay and other Full-bodied White Wines and Beaujolais-The ideal temperature for full-bodied white wines and fruity red wines is between 50 and 60 degrees. This temperature will allow the complexity of these wines to shine through.

Full-bodied Red Wines Such as Cabernet Sauvignon And Most Port Wines-Ideal temperatures for these “heavier” wines is between 60 and 65 degrees. Serving them at this temperature downplays the acerbic aspects of these wines while enhancing their lissome aspects.

Choose the best wine cooler you can and chill your wine to the proper temperature. It makes a huge difference.

Glass Ware

The shape and composition of your wine glass can have a drastic effect on the taste of your wine. Different types of wines should be served in glasses that were designed for them. You should also choose crystal over regular glass, but if you don’t have a choice then at least use glass that is clear and isn’t colored.

Following these steps will help you serve a better tasting wine each and every time. For more advanced serving suggestions, then please read our advanced guide on serving wine.

Basic Types Of White Wine

Today, we are going to cover the basic types of white wines. This guide is intended as a primer for those of you who have little to no experience with wines and isn’t intended for advanced wine drinkers. In this guide, I am not only going to show you the different types of white wine, but I am also going to show you what food pairs best with these wines and what you can expect when you taste each wine.

Before I start however, I want to emphasis that you need to purchase the best wine cooler available before you start trying out the different white wines varieties. That’s because white wine is particularly sensitive to temperature and needs to be stored correctly to get the best flavor out of the wine.

Chardonnay: This wine really gained a lot of popularity in the 1990s. This type of wine can be found in different varieties. There are Chardonnay wines that have a buttery texture, some that have citrus notes and some that are very velvety. All of these share one important characteristic, however. They all have a very voluptuous body. Chardonnay is best served with fish dishes or with light chicken dishes.

Sauvignon Blanc: This wine is a very versatile one. While all of the varieties of this type of wine exhibit a smoky quality, the primary notes of this wine can change from one to the other. For instance, there are brands of Sauvignon Blanc that have a herb taste to them and there are others that have more of a citrus note to them. Sauvignon Blanc is best served with salads, poultry (particularly duck) and seafood.

Moscato: Moscato is a sweet wine that always seems to have a fruity taste to it. Some varieties also exhibit sort of a grapefruit note to them, while others seem to be more musky. Moscato is a wine that is best served with desserts, but it can certainly be enjoyed on its own.

Pinot Grigio: Pinot Grigio is a dry wine that has a good bite to it. This best versions of this type of wine usually come from Germany and Italy, although there are many good versions made in the United States as well—particularly the versions from Oregon. Pinot Grigio is a wine that goes with just about anything, but its acidic profile makes it a good choice for Thai food or spicy Chinese dishes.

Riesling: Riesling is a fresh tasting wine that are usually lighter than Chardonnay wines and exhibit sort of apple aroma. This type of wine is particularly sensitive to temperature changes, so you should make sure to check out wine cooler reviews so you can select the best cooler possible. Riesling is best served with tuna, salmon, spicy Japanese dishes, chicken and pork.

Gewürztraminer: Gewürztraminer is a dry white that is aromatic and has either a fruity or floral taste to it. The best varieties of this type of wine comes from Germany, but there are some very good examples from both coasts of the United States. This type of wine is best served with fatty foods such as sausage and pork, but it is also a good choice to pair with most Asian dishes.

How To Buy A Wine Cooler – Part One

If you are looking to buy a new wine cooler but don’t know exactly what features you need, then you’ve come to the right place. Today, I am going to tell you the models and the features that are available out there and how to determine if a particular wine cooler is right for you. If you read through this two-part guide—and then check out some wine cooler reviews—then you can rest assured that you will find the ideal unit for all of your wine storage needs.

Wine Coolers Vs. Wine Cellar

The first thing you need to realize is that there is a difference between a wine cooler and a wine cellar. A wine cooler is intended to store your wine for short periods of time. These units cool your wine down to serving temperature—which is between 40 and 65 degrees—and holds it there until it is ready to be served. Wine should never be kept in a wine cooler longer than a year. If you need a long-term storage solution, then you are better off purchasing a wine cellar.

Best Wine Cooler Features

A good wine cooler needs to have a number of features to ensure that it keeps your wine in good serving condition. These features will give you a good idea of the difference between a really good cooler and a mediocre one.

Temperature Range

When searching for a wine cooler, you need to find one that has the greatest temperature variability as possible. The better coolers have a wide temperature range of about 25 degrees from the lowest setting to the highest setting. Lesser models often feature a very narrow temperature variability of about 10 degrees.

Why is it important to choose a cooler with a wide range? That’s because different wines are the best at different temperatures. For instance, sparkling wines are usually served at 40 to 50 degrees; while full-bodied red wines are served at a temperature between 60 and 65 degrees. Therefore, it is very important to find a unit with a wide temperature range, particularly if you enjoy a number of different wines.

Price Per Bottle

Another thing you need to consider when purchasing a wine cooler is the price versus the capacity of the cooler. Instead of trying to just find the lowest priced model, try this little tip instead. Take the total price of the unit and divide it by the number of bottles it holds. This gives you the price-per-bottle price that can be compared to other unit’s price-per-bottle price. Generally, you’ll want to purchase the unit with the lowest price-per-bottle price. Of course, this can be adjusted by your needs. For example, a 46 bottle cooler might have a lower price-per-bottle price, but you might only need to store 20-24 bottles. In this case, it would make more sense to purchase the cooler that fits your storage needs.

The above features are the basics of what you need to look for in a wine cooler. To see some of the other features you need to take into consideration, then please check out Part Two of this guide.

An Explanation Of Wine Types

The world of wine can be a confusing place. It seems like there are so many different types of wine that it would be impossible to learn about all of them. However, that doesn’t have to be the case. While there are a lot of different wines on the market today, you don’t have to know the details about them all. If you educate yourself in a select variety of wines, then that will arm you with enough information to make an educated wine purchase. Today, we are going to begin your wine education by giving you an explanation of the different wine types.

The first thing you should do is to educate yourself on some of the terms and practices used in the wine world. You can do this by reading the articles we have on this site and by reading wine cooler reviews. Once you have done that, you can finish your education with this article right here and learn about some of the available types of wine.

Red Versus White Wine

Okay, all of us here can tell the difference between a red and white wine, so I am not going to waste your time telling you something you already know. What I am going to do however, is tell you why red wine is different from white wine, and vice versa.

Wines get their color depending on whether the vintner leaves the grape’s skin in contact with the wine as it ferments. Skins contain tannin, a bitter substance that gives wine a dry, slightly bitter taste. If the vintner leaves the skins to ferment with the wine, then it will begin to color because of the accumulation of tannins. White wines are wines where the skin never ferments with the rest of the wine. The longer the skins ferment, the more tannin that’s released and the darker the color of the wine. The wine will then change color from white to blush to pink and then finally, to red. Red, of course, has the highest tannin content of all the wine varieties.

Red wine’s tannin content is the core of the wine. It not only affects taste but it also affects texture. The general rule is the darker the red wine the bolder it’s taste is. Because of their tannin content, you really want to avoid putting your red wine in your best wine cooler and lowering its temperature too much. That’s because tannin compounds get more bitter at lower temperatures, so be sure to never serve a red wine ice cold. Popular red wines include: Cabernet Franc, Sangiovese, Merlot, Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon.

White wine’s tannin content is very low. It has some but not enough to change its color. That is why white wine has a slightly acidic taste to it. Popular white wines include: Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and Riesling.

And that is all you really need to know about wines. Of course, this article is just a primer for newbies, so as you get more experienced you will want to further your education even more.

Your Guide To Sparkling Wines

A person might be the greatest wine enthusiast in the world and might not know much about sparkling wines. In fact, most people know little more about these type of wines than how to take them out of their best wine cooler and serve them. That is why I am writing this article today. Consider this article a primer that will teach you everything you need to know about sparkling wines.

What Makes Sparkling Wine So Sparkly?

Quite simply, carbon dioxide puts the sparkle into this brand of wine. This invisible gas creates the bubbles—or if you prefer, the effervescence—that makes sparkling wines sparkle. Why did vintners start making sparkling wine, you ask? Well, it’s quite simple. It was accidentally discovered as the result of a process of dual fermentation within kegs. A happy accident that has created some of the best wines in the world.

Today, vintners use two separate methods to create this secondary fermentation process. They either use the Méthode Traditionnelle, or the Traditional Method in English, or they use the more modern method called the Charmat Method. When the first batches of Champagne were being made, it was under the Traditional Method, but as time went on and Champagne became more popular, then alternative methods had to be explored that were less labor intensive and quicker.

That’s Interesting, But How Do I Serve It?

Okay, that was probably more of a history lesson than you really wanted. You probably just want to get down to the specifics of serving this great wine. That’s okay, I am going to take care of that right this second.

Sparkling wine should be served at a very cold temperature around 40 degrees. Champagne on the other hand should optimally be served at around 45 degrees. These temperatures have been gleaned from years of experience and shouldn’t be deviated from because these wines are at their peak at these temperatures.

When you are chilling down a sparkling wine or Champagne, you should never use your household freezer. This will result in your wine losing some of its effervescence. You really need to store it in a wine cooler specifically built for sparkling wines. You can find one of these models by searching through various wine cooler reviews and finding one that suits your needs.

What Food Should I Serve With My Sparkling Wine?

I’m glad you asked this question.  Foods that are sweet, fried in oil or salty should be served with Champagne. That’s because these foods and Champagne complement each other so well. Blanc de Blancs tend to go well with avocado based dishes and Italian pasta served in a white sauce. It also pairs well with Chinese food, poultry and rich desserts. Extra dry or Brut wines pair very well with any type of cheese, as well as seafood. And Blanc de Noirs tend to pair well with appetizers, poultry and fruit.

Everything You Wanted To Know About Rose Wines

If your best wine cooler is hungry for some other types of wines other than red or white, then you might want to try stocking it with some rose wines. Rose wines come in a variety of different shades of pink, from a soft hue all the way to a shocking pink. In Spain it’s called Rosado and in Italy its called Rosato. All names for what we call in the United States rose wine.

If you are thinking about stocking up on some rose wines, then allow this article to be your guide. I am not only going to tell you what gives rose wine its pink hue, but I am also going to explore their taste profile and suggest to you the best times to enjoy this sensational wine. Just bear with me and you’ll learn everything you ever wanted to know about this variety of wine.

Why is Rose Wine Pink?

Traditionally, rose wines derived their color from the tannin compounds released into the wine from the wine being in contact with the grape skins during the manufacturing process. The longer the grape skins were allowed to remain in contact with the rest of the wine, the deeper the color. Leaving these skins in contact with the wine for a short period produces a rose wine, while leaving it in contact with the wine for a longer period will result in a red wine.

However, nowadays it seems like more vintners are making rose wine by mixing together red and white wine grapes. This is particularly true in the sparkling rose wine category, but is also done in other types as well.

Rose Wine Taste Profile

Rose wines tend to be much like their red wine cousins, except they have more of a subtle flavor and texture. When you drink a rose wine you can expect a wine with a fruity flavor that is oftentimes underpinned by subtle notes of citrus.

The Best Time For Rose Wine

Rose wine is a versatile wine that goes equally well with red meat as it does seafood. It’s also the perfect wine for more casual dishes such as hamburgers, hot dogs and potato salad. And if you’re looking for a great wine to go with your chips and dip, then you can hardly go wrong with a great rose wine.

Since it is so subtle, light and refreshing it is often a great wine for the summer months. Particularly if you are spending a lot of time outdoors. Just be sure to check wine cooler reviews and buy a good cooler so you can chill that rose wine down until it’s nice and cold.

And that my friends, is everything you need to know about this type of wine. While it might not seem as glamorous as white or red wines, I assure you that it has just as much class as both of these types of wine. Give it a try and I think that you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

Ordering Wine On A Date – Part One

I normally spend my time writing wine cooler reviews, but sometimes I like to venture into other areas of the wine world. I have written articles on vintage wines, wine tasting and other areas of this subject where I have experience. You might just say that I have written more than a few articles on wine. However, I noticed recently that I have never written an article on how to properly order a wine on a date. How could I skip such an important subject? I certainly didn’t do it on purpose, I assure you. To prove that to you, I have written this very simple guide that will enable you to order wine at a restaurant with ease. I hope this article provides you with some useful information that you can use while out on a date.

Lay The Foundation

At this stage, you need to do some homework while placing your reservation at the restaurant. First, you need to find out if the restaurant serves wine. If they do, then ask the hostess about the wine list so you have an idea of what they have. You can also inquire if they will reserve a bottle of your selected wine for you. That will save you a lot of time and aggravation. However, you need to realize that not every restaurant will reserve a bottle. Most will, but there are some that definitely won’t.

If they don’t serve wine, then ask if they allow you to bring your own bottle, and if they do, ask them what is their corkage fee (the price you pay to have them uncork it).

Acquire The Wine List

Now that you and your date have arrived at the restaurant, it is time to get the wine list. Usually, restaurants will offer this to you first, but if they don’t then be sure to ask for it right away. You want your wine to be served before your food.

Reading the wine list can seem like an overwhelming task, but don’t let it get to you. So many different wines, all categorized by region, manufacturer, variety and date. Don’t let it go to you though. Just consider the following things and you’ll be just fine:

First ask your date: If she is a person who hates red wine, then that narrows your choices considerable. If she doesn’t have a preference, then ask her what she plans on eating. That way, you can pair a suitable wine with the meal.

Pairing Wine With Food: You may have heard that you are supposed to pair red wines with red meats and white wines with white meats or fish. Well, that is both true and false at the same time. It doesn’t really matter what type of meat is in the dish, what’s more important is how its prepared. Here are some examples:

Pair red wines with meaty dishes, salmon and dishes with heavy tomato-based sauces.

Pair white wines or sparkling wines with light meat and fish dishes, shell fishes and vegetables or pastas served with a cream sauce.

Now before you pick your wine and have them pull it from their best wine cooler, there are a few more things to consider. Please refer to the second part of this article for tips on determining price and dealing with the wine presentation.